How Heat Stress Happens

Man working outside. Thermometer reads 97 degrees F (36.1 degrees C)

1

Body’s means of controlling its internal temperature starts to fail

Worker wiping sweat from brow. Thermometr reads 99.7 degrees F (37.6 degrees C)

2

Once body temps reach 99.7°F (37.6°C), heat stress has begun to affect the body

Two paramedics bringing man into the hospital. Thermometer reads 104 degrees F (40 degrees C)

3

Severe illness occurs when body temperature reaches 104°F (40°C)

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Over 900 U.S. workers were killed and almost 80,000 seriously injured by heat stress between 1992 and 2020.

- Bureau of Labor Statistics

Heat Stress Solutions

Podcast

Videos

How To Use PPE with Evaporative and Phase Change Cooling Technologies to Prevent Heat Stress
How to Build a Heat Stress Rest & Prevention Station to Keep Workers Safe

Blog Articles

Working in the Heat: Outdoor vs. Indoor Heat Stress Prevention Programs

It’s time to face facts—everything on this green earth is getting hotter. 2020 tied the planet’s warmest year ever, joining 18 other record highs set since the turn of the millennium. For workers regularly bearing the brunt of these temps, these trends are not to be taken lightly. But, by developing worksite-specific heat illness prevention plans, safety managers can save lives as soon as today.

Toolbox Talks

Why Shaded Areas are Important For Breaks at Work - Toolbox Talks

In 2014, OSHA kicked off an annual campaign to train and educate workers about heat stress management called Water. Rest. Shade. Focused on shade, this Toolbox Talk can help you educate your crew on the importance of periodically seeking shelter from the sun during the workday.

How to Prevent Dehydration in the Heat - Toolbox talks

In 2014, OSHA kicked off an annual campaign to train and educate workers about heat stress management called Water. Rest. Shade. Use this Toolbox Talk to brief workers on the signs/symptoms of dehydration, as well as effective hydration strategies.

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness – Toolbox Talks

If it seems like summers have been getting hotter and more extreme, you’re right. On average, summers over the past decade have been hotter on average and bring more heat waves with temperatures that fall into the “extremely hot” category. This presents a challenge for you as you look to keep your workers safe in extreme weather.

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