HOW COLD STRESS HAPPENS

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Man working in snow. Thermometer reads 98.6 °F (37° C)

1

Body’s means of controlling its internal temperature starts to fail

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Man feeling symptoms of cold stress. Thermometer reads 98.6 °F (37° C)

2

Once body temps fall below 98.6°F (37°C), cold stress has begun to affect the body

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Ambulance driving through snow. Thermometer reads 95 °F (35° C)

3

Severe illness occurs when body temperature drops to 95°F (35°C)

THE COLD HARD FACTS

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Cold exposure resulted in 240 worksite injuries 2019. Additionally, 880 fatalities were caused by slips, trips & falls—a risk greatly heightened by cold and icy conditions. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Cold Stress Solutions

VIDEOS

Tread Boldly Indoors & Outdoors with TREX Spikeless Traction Powered by Michelin Tire Technology

BLOG POSTS

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Worker climbing in winter with ice traction

Decreasing Slips, Trips and Falls: How to Choose the Right Traction Device for the Job

If over a quarter century of America’s Funniest Home Videos has taught us anything, it’s that people fall—a lot. Each year in the North, over 42,000 workers are injured in fall accidents—accounting for nearly one out of every five “time-loss injuries”.

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A head-to-toe look at how to dress for the deep freeze

Cold Weather Gear Guide: How to Dress for Winter Work

While it certainly takes a special degree of mental fortitude to forge ahead in the bitter cold (Cancun is for quitters!), workers won’t get by safely on grit alone—no matter how thick their blood or their beards.

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Working working in the extreme cold with thermal work gloves on

Why Are My Hands Always Cold?: Your Guide To Choosing The Best Winter Work Gloves

We’ll take a look at common issues that alter performance and what to look for when buying thermal work gloves to keep your mitts warm and comfortable until it’s time to punch out.

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TOOLBOX TALKS

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Worker bundled up to work in the cold

Smart Scheduling For Winter Work Safety – Toolbox Talks

They say you should only worry about stuff you can control. If you’re a safety supervisor, weather is one thing you can’t control – but you can control your crews’ shift schedules. Often overlooked, it’s an easy way to mitigate the side effects of working in a cold environment.

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Toolbox Talks

Recognizing Hypothermia, Frostbite And Other Common Cold-related Illnesses – Toolbox Talks

Weather patterns are changing. Seasons becoming more extreme. And the ever-increasing unpredictability of Mother Nature is making it harder than ever for workers exposed to her wild weather swings to prepare.

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Podcast

 

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